Parent-Reported Health for Children Living in Northland*

2014 - 2017

What is it?
The trend graph shows the percentage of children, aged 0-14 years, living in Northland whose parents or caregivers rated their health as ‘excellent’, ‘very good’ or ‘good’. The shaded area represents the 95% confidence interval for each estimate.

Why is it important?
The perception of a child’s health by their parent or caregiver is an indication of their overall health status, and may also have an influence on how they use health services.


What does this mean for Northland?
In 2017, 97% of Northland children, aged 0-14 years old, were reported as being in excellent, very good or good health. This proportion has been relatively consistent from 2014 to 2017. Compared to New Zealand as a whole, there was no significant difference in the proportion of caregivers who reported their child’s health as excellent, very good or good (98% compared to 97% respectively).


* New Zealand Health Survey, Children, Parent-Rated Health 2013/14 - 2016/17, Ministry of Health.
A 95% confidence interval is a range of values that one can be 95% certain contains the true mean or proportion of the population.

Self-Reported Health of Adults Living in Northland*

2014 - 2017

What is it?
The graph shows the percentage of those living in Northland, aged 15 years and over, who reported their health as ‘excellent’, ‘very good’ or ‘good’. The shaded area represents the 95% confidence interval for each estimate.

Why is it important?
Perceived health status provides a proxy of ill health within a population. Health care utilisation is also influenced by how people perceive their health and need for medical attention.


What does this mean for Northland?
In 2017, 86% of adults living in Northland reported their health as being excellent, very good or good, a similar proportion to that of national percentage. There was no significant difference in this measure of self-reported health for Northland and New Zealand as a whole from 2014 and 2017.


* New Zealand Health Survey, Adults, Self-Rated Health 2013/14-2016/17, Ministry of Health.
A 95% confidence interval is a range of values that one can be 95% certain contains the true mean or proportion of the population.

Prevalence of Diabetes in Adults*

2014 - 2017

What is it?
The indicator shows the percentage of the adult population (aged 15 years and older), who have been diagnosed and are living with diabetes in Northland. The graph shows the trend over time, from 2014 to 2017.

Why is it important?
Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires on-going management and treatment and is one of the main causes of premature mortality in adults living in New Zealand. Some cases of diabetes are preventable with modifications to lifestyle behaviours, such as physical activity and nutrition. As a chronic illness, it requires on-going management and treatment. Having diabetes increases the risk of renal disease, cardiovascular disease and damage to the blood vessels of the eye (diabetic retinopathy).


What does this mean for Northland?
In 2017, a significantly higher percentage of Northlanders lived with diagnosed diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2) compared to New Zealand as a whole (6.5 % and 5.2 % respectively). The prevalence of diabetes is greater among the Māori population compared to European (7.5 % compared to 6%)*. The New Zealand Health Survey conducted in 2017 reported that nearly 5 % of adults living in Northland have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes specifically. There was no significant difference found in the percentage of Type 2 diabetes in Northland compared to that of New Zealand as a whole**.


*Health Quality and Safety Commission NZ, Diabetes Prevalence Atlas.
** New Zealand Health Survey, Adult, Diabetes 2013/14-2016/17 (age-standardised), Ministry of Health.

Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisation Rates in Children*

2014 - 2017

What is it?
Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations (ASH) are hospital admissions that may be avoidable if high quality primary or preventative care is received. The indicator shows the rate of avoidable hospital admissions per 100,000 people in children (aged 0 - 4 years) living in Northland, 2014 -2017.

Why is it important?
Currently, the rates of ASH for children are used to monitor and compare the performance of District Health Boards. We can use these rates to identify if there are ways we could work together better as a health sector, to improve well-being and avoid unnecessary admissions to hospital. We can also explore the rates to see if there are some groups in our population who are more at risk for this outcome than others.


What does this mean for Northland?
In 2017, the ASH rate for children living in Northland was higher than in New Zealand as a whole (7,336 compared to 6,416 per 100,000 respectively). From 2014 to 2017, there was a 3% decrease in ASH rates for Māori children in Northland (8,707 compared to 8,466 per 100,000). Overall, children living in Northland who identified as Māori were 1.4 times more likely than non-Māori children to experience a potentially avoidable hospital admission.


*Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations 5-year 2017, Ministry of Health.

Top 10 Conditions of Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations by Ethnicity for Children*

2014 - 2017

What is it?
Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations (ASH) are hospital admissions that could have potentially been avoided if primary or preventative care had been received earlier. The chart below shows the 10 top conditions contributing to avoidable hospitalisations for Northland children (aged 0 - 4 years) by ethnicity (2017).

Why is it important?
Currently, the rates of Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations (ASH) for children are used to monitor and compare the performance of District Health Boards. We can use these rates to identify if there are ways we could work together better as a health sector, to improve well-being and avoid unnecessary admissions to hospital. We can also explore the rates to see if there are some groups in our population who are more at risk for this outcome than others.


What does this mean for Northland?
Dental conditions were the leading causes for avoidable hospitalisation among children, aged 0-4 years, in Northland. Māori children were admitted at a rate more than two times higher than non-Māori children for these conditions (2,393 per 100,000 compared to 1,002 per 100,000 respectively). A similar finding was seen with the rate of admission for asthma conditions, with over two times more children who identify as Māori compared to non-Māori being admitted (1856 compared to 790 per 100,000 respectively).


*Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations 5-year 2017, Ministry of Health.

Child Admissions due to Asthma or Wheeze*

2014

What is it?
The indicator shows the proportion of children (aged 28 days to 14 years) who were admitted to hospital with asthma or wheeze as the primary diagnosis, for Northland compared to New Zealand as a whole. The figure also shows the Northland rates for Māori children compared to non-Māori children.

Why is it important?
Asthma is a common condition, which has implications for the ability of children to participate in school and recreational activities. Good primary care management of the condition can reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations, and also the risk of hospitalisation.


What does this mean for Northland?
In Northland, 6% of childhood admissions had a primary diagnosis of asthma or wheeze, comparable to of the rate across New Zealand (also 6%). Māori children had significantly higher rates of admission than those identifying as non-Māori, 8% and 3% respectively.


Did you know?


Second-hand smoke affects children’s delicate lungs making them more likely to develop asthma, and to experience more frequent and more severe asthma attacks. Keeping open spaces like playgrounds and outdoor patios, as well as cars and homes, smoke-free can protect our tamariki from exposure to second-hand smoke.

Check out the link below to explore how asthma affects the lungs.


Source credit: Tobacco Control Research Tūranga, MedTech CoRE and Auckland Bioengineering Institute


* HQSC Atlas of Healthcare Variation, (Asthma), Health Quality and Safety Commission NZ.

Prevalence of Identified Gout in Adults *

2014

What is it?
The indicator shows the proportion of the population aged 20 years and over with gout. This estimate includes those people who have had a hospital admission with a diagnosis of gout or have been prescribed allopurinol or colchicine (medications almost only prescribed to treat gout) in the community. The graph shows a comparison between Northland and New Zealand, as well as Northland’s NZ Māori population to non- Māori.

Why is it important?
Gout is a painful form of arthritis that can affect toe, foot, ankle, knee, hand and elbow joints; acute attacks of gout can disrupt home and work life, and can lead to long-term joint damage. Rates of gout are typically higher in the NZ Māori population compared to non- Māori. Understanding the burden of gout in our community is important in service planning, particularly because many acute flares of gout can be prevented with medication and lifestyle management.


What does this mean for Northland?
In 2014, around 7% of the Northland population aged 20 years and over were affected by gout, a significantly higher proportion than that nationally (5%). Overall, more than 10% of NZ Māori in Northland had gout, compared to 6% in the non- Māori Northland population.


* HQSC Atlas of Healthcare Variation, (Gout), Health Quality and Safety Commission NZ.

Mental Health Status of Adults*

2014 - 2017

What is it?
The indicator shows the percentage of population aged 15 years and over experiencing mental health disorders; including psychological distress, depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder and other mood disorders.

Why is it important?
Mental health disorders are the third highest leading cause of health loss for New Zealanders, behind cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Understanding the mental health needs of our population is important in planning services.


What does this mean for Northland?
Overall, the prevalence of mental health disorders in Northland is comparable to New Zealand as a whole. Depression was the most commonly reported condition, experienced by more than 17% of adults living in Northland.


* New Zealand Health Survey , Adult, Mental Health 2013/14-2016/17 (age-standardised), Ministry of Health.

Linkedin logo
Facebook logo
Ministry of Health logo