2017

What is it?
The indicator shows the population of Northland in 2017, as estimated by Statistic NZ, and its distribution over ‘territorial authorities’.

Why is it important?
Population distributions and estimates help plan health and social services to meet the changing needs of our population.



What does this mean for Northland?
The total population of Northland was estimated to be 175,400 people in 2017. Whangarei district had the highest population of 89, 700, followed by the Far North and Kaipara districts with populations of 63,200 and 22,500 respectively. Northlanders make up 3.7 % of the total NZ population.


*Subnational Population Estimates, 30 June 2006 - 17, Stats NZ.
A territorial authority is defined under the Local Government Act 2002 as a city council or district council.

2013

What is it?
The indicator shows the ethnic identity of Northlanders by percentage compared to New Zealand (NZ) as a whole as reported in 2013. Population proportions may exceed 100% as respondents may identify as more than one ethnicity.

Why is it important?
The ethnicity of the population is an important consideration when planning and designing health services to best meet individual and community needs.


What does this mean for Northland?
Approximately 34% of Northlanders identify as NZ Māori, a larger percentage compared to that of the total NZ population (16%). The proportion of people who identify as Pacific or Asian is lower in Northland (7%) compared to that nationally (20%). A similar percentage of Northlanders identify as NZ European or other (including New Zealander) compared to NZ as a whole.


*Estimated Resident Population by Ethnicity as of 30 June 2013, Stats NZ.

2013

What is it?
The indicator shows how people and whānau live in Northland according to the composition of their household compared to the New Zealand (NZ) population. The infographic and analysis was done by the Social Policy Evaluation and Research Unit (SUPERU).

Why is it important?
Understanding how people live helps guide the delivery of health and social services; it may also have an impact on health needs. For example, individuals living alone or those with children may experience different barriers and challenges in accessing health care.


What does this mean for Northland?
38% of Northlander’s live as a couple with one or both individuals aged over 50 years old, and with no children remaining at home. Less than one third (29%) of Northland families are two parents with at least one child under the age of 18 years. This compares with 34% of families in NZ as a whole.


*Family wellbeing in Northland, February 2017, SUPERU.

2013

What is it?
The indicator shows the percentage of the population in different age groups for Northland compared to the New Zealand (NZ) population.

Why is it important?
Different age groups have different health and social needs. Knowing the age structure of our population is useful for understanding current patterns around health and well-being, and also to help in planning services for the future.


What does this mean for Northland?
The proportions of those aged 0-14 years and those aged 65 years and over were higher in Northland compared to NZ as a whole. However, the percentage of Northlanders aged between 20 and 49 years was smaller than that of NZ population.


*Estimated Resident Population as of 30 June 2013, Stats NZ.

2013

What is it?
The indicator shows the percentage of the Northland population in different age groups, for non-Māori and NZ Māori ethnic groups.

Why is it important?
Age has an influence on health and social activities and outcomes. It is important to consider differences in the age structure of a population when we make comparisons between ethnic groups.


What does this mean for Northland?
In 2013, the population of NZ Māori, in Northland, had a more youthful age-structure than the non-Māori population. 34% of those identifying as Māori in Northland were under 15 years of age, compared to 20% of non-Māori for the same age range. In contrast, the percentage of those aged 65 years or older identifying as Māori in Northland (7%) was much lower than that of non-Māori (20%).


*Estimated Resident Population as of 30 June 2013, Stats NZ.

1996 - 2017

What is it?
The indicator shows the age structure of the Northland population by gender, with males on the left and females on the right, and how it has changed from the year 1996 to 2017.

Why is it important?
The total population of a region is useful in the planning of resources and services. Understanding how the age structure of our population is changing over time is important information in preparing for future health needs.


What does this mean for Northland?
The population of Northland (as estimated in 2017) was around 175,400; which was an increase of 20% since 1996. The sex ratio was approximately similar throughout the 1996 – 2017 time periods (as seen in the figure).

The elderly population (aged 65 years or older) has experienced the highest percentage growth over time. The increased population of elderly in the region is relevant for health service planning, as this age group has comparatively higher health need.


*Subnational Population Estimates, 30 June 2006 - 17, Stats NZ.

2013 - 2033

What is it?
The indicator shows the population of Northland in 2013 by ‘census area units’, and how it is predicted to change over the next twenty years.

Why is it important?
Population projections help us to plan health and social services to meet the changing needs of our communities. Understanding where our people live can help with placing health and social services closer to home.




What does this mean for Northland?
Marsden Point, Mangawhai and Mangawhai Heads, are the areas projected to have the largest population growth during the period 2013 - 2033. Some areas of the Mid-North (i.e. Moerewa, Kaeo, and Hokianga) are predicted to have a decline in population over this time period.

The population of Northland was estimated at 175,400 people in 2017. Overall, the region has experienced a 6% population growth since 2013 (164,700). Over half (51%) of the region’s population resides in the Whangarei district. Northland residents’ account for 3.6% of the New Zealand population of 4,442,100 (estimated in 2013).


*Estimated Resident Population as of 30 June 2013, 2017, Stats NZ.
Projection based on medium assumptions as defined by Stats NZ .
Census area units are aggregations of meshblocks. They are non-administrative areas that are in between meshblocks and territorial authorities in size.

2013 - 2033

What is it?
The indicator shows the total population of Northland by ethnicity in 2013, and how it is predicted to change. Population proportions may exceed 100% as respondents may identify as more than one ethnicity.

Why is it important?
Ethnic groups may have different experiences of health and barriers to accessing high quality and timely care. There may also be variations in health and social behaviours that impact on wellbeing. Population projections help us to plan health and social services to meet the changing needs of our population.


What does this mean for Northland?
By 2033, approximately 39% of the population will identify as NZ Māori, a 5% increase from 2013 (34%). Additionally, it is predicted that from 2013 to 2033, the proportion of Northlanders who identify as Asian or Pacific will increase (3% to 7%, and 4% to 7% respectively). Overall, 75% of Northlanders will identify as NZ European or Other (including New Zealander) in 2033 - a 1% decrease compared to 2013.


*Population Projections, Ethnicity 2013 (base) – 2038 as of 30 June 2013, Stats NZ.
Projection based on medium assumptions as defined by Stats NZ .

2013 - 2033

What is it?
The indicator shows the age structure of the Northland population in 2013, and how it is predicted to change over the next twenty years.

Why is it important?
Population projections help us to plan health and social services to meet the changing needs of our population in the future.


What does this mean for Northland?
By 2033, the population of Northland is predicted to grow by 14%, with the largest increase likely to be seen amongst the 75 years and older age group. The greatest decrease is predicted to occur amongst those aged 45- 59 years old; Northland’s child and youth population (0-14 years) is also anticipated to decline by around 3% from 2013 to 2033.


*Population Projections, 2013 (base) - 2038 as of 30 June 2013, Stats NZ.
Projection based on medium assumptions as defined by Stats NZ .

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